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Freshwater Algae of the Southeastern United States: Part 7: Pigmented Euglenophyceae

Series: Bibliotheca Phycologica Volume: 106

By: Gary E Dillard (Author)

175 pages, 20 plates with b/w line drawings

Gebrüder Borntraeger Verlag

Paperback | Dec 2000 | #113235 | ISBN: 3443600336
Availability: Usually dispatched within 1-2 weeks Details
NHBS Price: £57.99 $74/€69 approx

About this book

Language: English

The seventh part of a compendium of freshwater algae found in eleven states of the United States. Freshwater Algae of the Southeastern United States: Part 7: Pigmented Euglenophyceae contains 8 genera, 246 species and 45 intraspecific taxa of pigmented Euglenophyceae. Dillard compiles data from 143 years of floristic research on Euglenophyceae and gives access to more than 320 publications from the United States and worldwide.

"Dillard presents the seventh part of a compendium of freshwater algae found in eleven states of the United States. Part 1 and 2 deal with Chlorophyceae s.l., parts 3-6 with Zygnematophyceae. The treatment of Cyanophyceae, Dinophyceae, Cryptophyceae, Chrysophyceae and Xanthoophyceae is planned.

This publication contains 8 genera, 246 species and 45 intraspecific taxa of pigmented Euglenophyceae. Dillard compiles data from 143 years of floristic research on Euglenophyceae and gives access to more than 320 publications from the United States and worldwide. The aim of the compendium is to provide both a check list of algae in the Southeastern United States and a flora with keys for determination. All taxa are described in detail and illustrated by line drawings of varying quality.

In general, there are three methods for authors of floras and monographs to select figures. The first way is to use reproductions of the original descriptions (e.g. Hegewald & Silva 1988, Catalogue of Scenedesmus, Biblioth. Phycol. 80) to show the identity of a described taxon. The second way is to reproduce figures from the region covered by the flora (e.g. Ling & Tyler 2000, Australian freshwater algae, Biblioth. Phycol. 105) to show what researchers really found. The method of the reviewed flora, as of many other floras, is to select illustrations "based upon authoritative sources" (p. 1). This is a good compromise in many cases where figures given in floras are very similar to the type and a taxon is easily recognisable by a figure. In few cases, where the figure differs from the original description, this method is not appropriate. The figure of Phacus pleuronectes (O. F. Müll.) Dujard., taken from Allegre & Jahn 1943 (Trans. Amer. Microscop. Soc. 62: 233-244), is probably not the same taxon which was illustrated by Dujardin 1841 (Histoire naturelle des zoophytes), and surely not the same taxon O. F. Müller saw when describing the basionym.

Dillard does not follow all new combinations of the last years. so the number of synonyms is restricted. Phacus aenigmaticus Drezopolski, e.g., actually is a synonym of Phacus striates France. This was overlooked in the past because of a wrong interpretation of the original description by Lemmermann 1913 (Eugleninae in: Pascher, Die Süßwasser-Flora Deutschlands, Österreichs und der Schweiz 2,2). Trachelomonas scabra Playfair is regarded as a Strombomonas by many authors. Smile synonyms are ambiguous. as on p. 87: "Trachelomonas crebea Kellicott [includes v. Iaticollis Weik et Mohlenbrock]". It is not clear whether this means T. crebea s.l., or that T crebea var. Iaticollis is synonymous to T. crebea var. crebea.

In the text, especially in the references, there are some small but annoying errors (Euglena Ehrenb. was described in 1830,. not in 1838. "Skvortzov" and "Skvotzow" are used alternately. and almost all diacritical signs are ignored ("France" instead of "France", etc.).

The selection of pigmented Euglenophyceae in this book is restricted to taxa found in the Southeastern United States. The publication of Weik 1967 (A revision of the genus Phacus Dujardin in Illinois), e.g., is not included because Illinois is outside the geographical scope. There is, however, the possibility that taxa found in states nearby, or common Euglenophyceae with worldwide distribution, occur in the Southeastern United States. too. A note on taxa similar to those included in the Indira, but so fat not known from the region, would thus have been very helpful Rn users not familiar - with this group of flagellates.

Dillard presents a conscientiously compiled check list which hopefully will inspire the floristic research in the Southeastern United States. Colleagues from other regions. dealing with taxonomic, floristic and biogeographical research aspects will consult Dillard's flora additional to other sources. Dillard's keys, easy to follow without expert knowledge, can be recommended for determination, if the results are carefully checked against floras containing more taxa and/or against original descriptions."

- Wolf-Henning Kusber, Wildenowia 30, p. 201 (2000)


Contents

Introduction 1
Key to Classes 2
Class Euglenophyceae 4
Key to Orders of the Euglenophyceae 5
Order Euglenales 5
Family Euglenaceae 5
Key to Southeastern Genera of Euglenaceae 6
Eutreptia 7
Euglena 7
Key to Main Groups of Euglena 8
Key to Southeastern Species of Euglena 8
Lepocinclis 39
Key to Southeastern Species of Lepocinclis 39
Phacus 45
Key to Southeastern Species of Phacus 45
Strombomonas 69
Key to Southeastern Species of Strombomonas 70
Trachelomonas 76
Key to Southeastern Species of Trachelomonas 76
Cryptoglena 106
OrderColaciales 106
Colacium 107
Bibliography-LiteratureCited 108
Index 129
Plates 135


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