Books  Ecology  Biogeography & Invasive Species 

Evolutionary Biogeography: An Integrative Approach with Case Studies

By: Juan J Morrone (Author)

320 pages, illustrations

Columbia University Press

Hardback | Jan 2009 | #176268 | ISBN-13: 9780231143783
Availability: Usually dispatched within 5 days Details
NHBS Price: £41.50 $52/€49 approx

About this book

Emphasizing basic concepts, methods, and empirical examples, Juan J. Morrone provides an introduction to evolutionary biogeography, which uses distributional, phylogenetic, molecular and fossil data to assess the historical changes that have produced current biotic patterns. Morrone's book is the first to propose a comprehensive treatment of the developments and theories of evolutionary biogeography (rather than being partisan to only one approach), comparing available methods and discussing the appropriate time to use them. Case studies make it clear to students and scholars which method is best for the question they might answer.

Panbiogeography, parsimony analysis of endemicity, cladistic biogeography, and phylogeography are four recent and most commonly used biogeographic approaches. Many conceive of these methods as representing different "schools," but Morrone shows that they are able to address different questions in the various steps of an evolutionary biogeographical analysis. Panbiogeography and parsimony analysis of endemicity are useful for identifying biotic components or areas of endemism. Cladistic biogeography uses phylogenetic data to determine the relationships between these biotic components. Further information on fossils and molecular clocks can be incorporated to identify different cenocrons, and finally, available geological knowledge can help construct a geobiotic scenario that may explain how analyzed areas were put into contact and how the biotic components and cenocrons inhabiting them evolved.

"is well suited for any novice in the field of historic biogeography by providing a broad synopsis and very good introductions to each method."
Basic and Applied Ecology

"Evolutionary Biogeography covers the scope of biogeography in a much more thorough and comprehensive way than any other textbook to date, providing a unique and most excellent contribution on the subject."
– John Robert Grehan, Buffalo Museum of Science

"Evolutionary Biogeography is a valuable contribution. Juan J. Morrone incorporates case studies that are both useful and interesting, providing a great compendium for an important area of scholarship."
– Glen M. MacDonald, Departments of Geography and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles

 


Contents

Preface

Chapter 1. INTRODUCING EVOLUTIONARY BIOGEOGRAPHY
What is evolutionary biogeography
Step 1: Identification of biotic components
Step 2: Testing relationships among biotic components
Step 3: Regionalization
Step 4: Identification of cenocrons
Step 5: Construction of a geobiotic scenario
How to read this book

Chapter 2. BASIC CONCEPTS
Biogeography
Ecological and historical biogeography
Hierarchies and scales in biogeography
Biogeographic patterns
Biogeographic processes
Biotic components and cenocrons
Prediction/ retrodiction
Biogeographic approaches and methods
Evolutionary biogeography
Major references
For discussion
Glossary

Chapter 3. A BRIEF HISTORY OF EVOLUTIONARY BIOGEOGRAPHY
The beginnings of biogeography
Classical biogeography
Darwinian biogeography
Extensionists and other unorthodox biogeographers
The New York school of zoogeography
Centers of origin
Phylogenetic biogeography
Panbiogeography
Refuge theory
Cladistic biogeography
Panbiogeographers versus cladistic biogeographers
Cenogenesis, cenocrons and horofaunas
Taxon pulses
Phylogeography
Conclusions
Major references
For discussion
Glossary

Chapter 4. IDENTIFICATION OF BIOTIC COMPONENTS
Biotic components
Panbiogeography
Individual tracks
Generalized tracks
Nodes
Areas of endemism
Methods
Minimum-spanning tree method
Case study 4.1: Biogeography and evolution of North American cave Collembola
Case study 4.2: Distributional patterns of Mexican marine mammals
Track compatibility
Case study 4.3: Biogeography of the Subantarctic islands
Case study 4.4: Biogeography of the Sierra de Chiribiquete (Colombia)
Parsimony analysis of endemicity (PAE)
Case study 4.5: Biogeography of the Mexican cloud forests
Case study 4.6: Distribution of butterflies in the Western Palearctic
Endemicity analysis
Case study 4.7: Areas of endemism in southern South America
Evaluation of the methods
Major references
Problems
For discussion
Glossary

Chapter 5. TESTING RELATIONSHIPS AMONG BIOTIC COMPONENTS
Cladistic biogeography
Taxon-area cladograms
Resolved area cladograms
General area cladograms
Methods
Component analysis
Case study 5.1: Cladistic biogeography of Central Chile
Brooks parsimony analysis (BPA)
Case study 5.2: Cladistic biogeography of afromontane spiders
Case study 5.3: Biogeographic history of the North American warm desert biota
Three area statement analysis
Case study 5.4: Cladistic biogeography of the "blue ash" eucalypts
Tree reconciliation analysis
Case study 5.5: Biogeography of South American assassin bugs (Hemiptera)
Case study 5.6: Biogeography of plant and animal taxa in the Southern Hemisphere
Paralogy-free subtree analysis
Case study 5.7: Biogeography of the Northern Andes
Case study 5.8: Biogeography of Rhododendron section Vireya in the Malesian Archipelago
Dispersal-vicariance analysis
Case study 5.9: Historical biogeography of the Subantarctic subregion
Area cladistics
Case study 5.10: Cladistic biogeography of the Hawaiian islands
Phylogenetic analysis for comparing trees (PACT)
Case study 5.11: Dispersal of hominines in the Old World
Evaluation and classification of the methods
Major references
Problems
For discussion
Glossary

Chapter 6. REGIONALIZATION
Biogeographical classification
Realms, regions and transition zones
Regionalization of the world
Case study 6.1: Regionalization of Latin America
Major references
Problems
For discussion
Glossary

Chapter 7. IDENTIFICATION OF CENOCRONS
Time-slicing
Methods
Temporally partitioned component analysis (TPCA)
Case study 7.1: Dinosaurian biogeography
Intraspecific phylogeography
Case study 7.2: Phylogeography of red deers in Eurasia
Case study 7.3: Phylogeographic predictions of a weevil species of the Canary Islands
Molecular clocks
Case study 7.4: The Mediterranean Lago Mare theory and the speciation of European freshwater fishes
Case study 7.5: The arrival of caviomorph rodents and platyrrhine primates in South America
Major references
Problems
For discussion
Glossary

Chapter 8. CONSTRUCTION OF A GEOBIOTIC SCENARIO
Geographic features
Plate tectonics
Major references
For discussion
Glossary

Chapter 9. TOWARD AN INTEGRATIVE BIOGEOGRAPHY
Major references
For discussion

REFERENCES


Write a review

There are currently no reviews for this product. Be the first to review this product!


Biography

Juan J. Morrone is professor of biogeography, systematics, and comparative biology at the Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Mexico City. He is the author, coauthor, editor, or coeditor of twenty-one books and two hundred scientific papers on biogeography, systematics, biodiversity, and evolution.

Bestsellers in this subject

Alien Plants

NHBS Price: £27.99 £34.99 (Save £7.00) $35/€33 approx

Field Guide to Invasive Plants & Animals in Britain

NHBS Price: £24.99 $32/€30 approx

Detecting and Responding to Alien Plant Incursions

NHBS Price: £37.99 $48/€45 approx

Reclaiming South Georgia

NHBS Price: £24.99 $32/€30 approx

Invasive Species: What Everyone Needs to Know

NHBS Price: £10.99 $14/€13 approx