Books  Habitats, Ecosystems & Natural Spaces  Forests - General & Temperate 

How Trees Die: The Past, Present, and Future of Our Forests

By: Jeff Gillman

234 pages, 30 b/w illus

Westholme Publishing

Hardback | Oct 2009 | #179787 | ISBN-13: 9781594160813
Temporarily out of stock: order now to get this when available Details
NHBS Price: £21.95 $28/€26 approx

About this book

This is a superbly written volume that shows how understanding the death of trees is vitally important to understanding the future of our environment. Throughout history trees have played an essential role in the success of the human race - not only have they provided us with food, shelter, warmth, the means for transportation, and countless products, they have also helped create an environment and an atmosphere in which we can survive. Once upon a time, there were forests that covered almost entire continents, but they receded as the human race began to clear the landscape in favour of building cities and organized agriculture - all the while abusing the forests we didn't cut down.

"How Trees Die" shows how, although not as readily apparent as other forms of domestication, our ancient and intimate relationship with trees has caused their lives to be inseparably entwined with ours, and that the death of a tree is just as important to our understanding of the environment - and its future - as how it lives.


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Biography

Jeff Gillman is associate professor of horticultural science at the University of Minnesota.

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