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The Death of Expertise

Explores how a culture of extreme egalitarianism made "expertise" synonymous with "elitism"
Argues that mass journalism, the internet, and commodification of the modern university are culpable in the decline of intellectualism
Shows how confirmation bias has facilitated anti-vaccination and other nonscientific movements

By: Tom Nichols (Author)

Oxford University Press

Hardback | Apr 2017 | #225929 | ISBN-13: 9780190469412
Available for pre-order: Due Apr 2017 Details
NHBS Price: £16.99 $21/€19 approx

About this book

In recent years, a cult of anti-expertise has engulfed America. While the United States has long been prone to bouts of anti-intellectualism, because of far-reaching technological and social transformations the current variant is of a different order. From the anti-vaccination movement to citizen blogging to uninformed attacks on GMOs, the nation has witnessed a surge in intellectual egalitarianism.

As Tom Nichols shows in The Death of Expertise, there are a number of reasons why this has occurred, ranging from easy access to Internet search engines to a customer satisfaction model within higher education. The product of these interrelated trends, Nichols argues, is a pervasive distrust of expertise among the public along with an unfounded belief among non-experts that their opinions should have equal standing with those of the experts. The experts are not always right, of course – after all, the leaders who rushed headlong into the Vietnam War were the "best and the brightest".

Nichols discusses expert failure at length, but he makes the crucial point that bad decisions by experts can and have been effectively challenged by other experts. That is fine, he argues. The problem now is that the democratization of information dissemination has engendered an army of ill-informed citizens inveighing against expertise. When challenged, non-experts typically resort to the canard that the experts are often wrong. That may be true, but the solution is not to jettison expertise as an ideal; it is to improve our expertise. He is certainly not opposed to information democratization, but rather the leap to enlightenment that that millions of lightly educated people believe they make when the scour WebMD or Wikipedia. Nichols shows in vivid detail the ways in which this impulse is coursing through our culture and body politic, but his larger goal is to explain the benefits that expertise and rigorous learning regimes bestow upon all societies, not just the United States.


Introduction - A Nation of Explainers

Chapter One - Higher Education: The Customer is Always Right
Chapter Two - Let me Google That for You: The Impact of the Internet
Chapter Three - History is Bunk, and So is Science: How Conversation Became Exhausting
Chapter Four - The New Journalism - and New Journalists
Chapter Five - Don't Blame Us: Why Expertise and Policy Aren't the Same Thing
Chapter Six - When the Experts are Wrong

Conclusion - Democracy, Expertise, and Citizenship

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