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Revision of the Cardinal Fish Genus Cheilodipterus (Perciformes: Apogonidae), with Description of Five New Species

Identification KeyMonograph

Series: Indo-Pacific Fishes Volume: 22

By: Ofer Gon (Author)

64 pages, 5 plates with 28 colour photos; 19 b/w line drawings and b/w distribution maps, 24 tables

Bishop Museum

Paperback | Dec 1993 | #60218
Availability: Usually dispatched within 1-2 months Details
NHBS Price: £28.99 $37/€34 approx

About this book

The apogonid fish genus Cheilodipterus is distinguished from all other apogonid genera in having the following character combination: canine teeth in both jaws: supramaxilla present; dorsal fin formula VI-I,9; ctenoid scales; and a preopercle with serrate edge and smooth ridge. The genus contains 15 species: alleni n. sp., with a serrate preopercular edge, 13 pectoral rays, 28 lateral-line scales, 12-15 developed gill rakers, no dark caudal spot in adults (present in juveniles), and 8 body stripes, is described from Papua New Guinea; arms, usually with a smooth preopercular edge, 13 pectoral rays, 28 lateral-line scales, 11-17 developed gill rakers, small dark caudal spot, and 7-10 body stripes, is distributed from East Africa to the Tuamotu Archipelago, excluding the Red Sea and the Persian Gulf; intermedius n. sp., with a serrate preopercular edge, 13 pectoral rays, 28 lateral-line scales, 7-9 developed gill rakers, a small dark caudal spot, and 8 body stripes, is described from the western Pacific Ocean; isostigmus, with 12 pectoral rays, 27 lateral-line scales, 8-12 developed gill rakers, and 5 body stripes, is known from the western Pacific Ocean; lachneri, with 14 pectoral-fin rays, 28 lateral-line scales, 11-14 developed gill rakers and 9-13 body stripes, is a presumed Red Sea endemic; lineatus (arabicus and caninus are synonyms), with 14 pectoral rays, 28 lateral-line scales, 10-13 developed gill rakers and 13-16 body stripes, occurs in the western Indian Ocean and the Red Sea except for the Gulf of Aqaba; macrodon, the largest of the species, with a serrate preopercular edge, 13 pectoral rays, 28 lateral-line scales, 7-11 developed gill rakers, a dark brown bar around caudal peduncle (or large dark caudal spot), and 7-10 body stripes, is distributed from East Africa and the Red Sea to Pitcairn Island in southeastern Oceania; nigrotaeniatus, with 11 pectoral rays, 27 lateral-line scales, 10-12 developed gill rakers, and 4 body stripes, is known only from the southern Philippines and the Molucca Islands, Indonesia; novemstriatus with 12 pectoral rays, 27 lateral-line scales, 11-15 developed gill rakers, 4 body stripes, and a curved stripe between pelvic-fin base and lower pectoral-fin base, is distributed from the Red Sea to the Persian Gulf; parazonatus n. sp., with 11 pectoral rays, 27 lateral-line scales, 10-13 developed gill rakers, and a single midlateral body stripe, is described from the western Pacific Ocean; persicus n. sp., with 14 pectoral rays, 28 lateral-line scales, 14-17 developed gill rakers, and 10-13 body stripes, is described from the Persian Gulf; pygmaios n. sp., with 11 pectoral rays, 27 lateral-line scales, 12-15 developed gill rakers, and 5 body stripes, is the smallest species of Cheilodipterus and is known only from the Red Sea; quinquelineatus, with 12 pectoral rays, 27 lateral-line scales, 8-14 developed gill rakers,and 5 body stripes, is distributed from East Africa and the Red Sea to Ducie Atoll in the Pitcairn Group; singapurensis (truncatus and subulatus are synonyms), with 12 pectoral rays, 27 lateral-line scales, 6-11 developed gill rakers, slanted posterodorsal margin of maxilla, and 5 body stripes, is distributed in the western Pacific Ocean; zonatus, with 11 pectoral rays, 27 lateral-line scales, 10-11 developed gill rakers and 2 body stripes, is known only from the western Pacific Ocean.

Three species of Cheilodipterus mimic species of saber-toothed blennies (genus Meiacanthus): nigrotaeniatus mimics M. grammistes; parazonatus mimics M. vittatus; and zonatus mimics M. geminatus. The large lower canines of the species of Meiacanthus are venomous.


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