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Academic & Professional Books  Reference  Physical Sciences  Cosmology & Astronomy

1001 Celestial Wonders to See Before You Die The Best Sky Objects for Star Gazers

Handbook / Manual
By: Michael E Bakich
492 pages, 250 black & white illustrations, 12 colour illustrations
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
1001 Celestial Wonders to See Before You Die
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  • 1001 Celestial Wonders to See Before You Die ISBN: 9781441917768 Paperback May 2010 Usually dispatched within 1-2 weeks
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About this book Contents Customer reviews Biography Related titles

About this book

Many deep-sky objects that can appear quite wonderful in photographs can be hard to observe in the telescope. This book is your guide to the more interesting nebulae, star clusters, and galaxies, objects that will bring gasps when you see them through a telescope.

Author Michael E. Bakich shows you how to spot constellations you've heard of but haven't been able to find. He gives you lists of bright deep-sky objects to target on clear nights. And he guides your search for the famous named splendors you've heard of - and perhaps seen a picture of - and would like to see through your own telescope. Bakich, an observer since he was in third grade, knows the sky better than most. In his current position as senior editor and also photo editor for the highly regarded Astronomy magazine, he has the technical expertise and finely honed communication skills to help you easily locate the best sites in the sky. His more than 250 astroimages help you identify the detail in these sky wonders. Bakich organizes his 1,001 objects according to their best viewing months, so anytime is a good time to pick up this book and start observing. As long as you know what month it is, just head for that chapter, set up your scope, and off you go!

Contents

Foreward.- Preface.- Acknowledgements.-Contents.- January.- February.- March.- April.- May.- June.- July.- August.- September.- October.- November.- December.- Index.

Customer Reviews

Biography

Michael E. Bakich lives in Milwaukee, and is a Senior Editor at "Astronomy" magazine. He has previously published "The Cambridge Guide to the Constellations" (1995), "The Cambridge Planetary Handbook" (2000), and "The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Amateur Astronomy" (2003). In addition he has written and edited the following "Astronomy" 'bookazines' of around 100 pgs., each: "Atlas of the Stars" (2006), "Hubble's Greatest Pictures" (2007), and "The 100 Most Spectacular Sky Wonders" (2008). He is also the author of many recent articles.
Handbook / Manual
By: Michael E Bakich
492 pages, 250 black & white illustrations, 12 colour illustrations
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Media reviews
From the reviews: "Astronomy writer/journalist Bakich ! presents a 'bucket list' for astronomers--celestial wonders to observe before one 'kicks the bucket.' ! this book so interesting ! . The book is ideal for amateur observers from beginning to experienced. ! For professional astronomers, especially those who may not have looked through a telescope for most of their careers, actually observing some of these gems can remind them why they got interested in astronomy in the first place. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All public and undergraduate libraries." (R. R. Erickson, Choice, Vol. 48 (6), February, 2011)
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