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British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published six times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

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Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

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The Flora of the Russian Arctic

General Editors: AI Tolmachev and BA Yurtsev
Translated from the Russian by Graham CD Griffiths
General English Series Editor: John G Packer

Originally published in Russian between 1969 and 1987 in ten volumes, Flora Arctica URSS was written by botanists of the Komarov Botanical Institute, St. Petersburg. The English translation, The Flora of the Russian Arctic, will be published in six volumes. The first two volumes include the ferns, gymnosperms and monocotyledons. The remaining four are devoted to the dicotyledons. The work of documenting and describing arctic species and establishing their evolutionary relationships is an international enterprise that has been in progress for more than two hundred years. During this period, floras of the various parts of the Arctic have been published, but there has never been a flora of the whole Russian Arctic available in English. The size of the area covered, the comprehensive content and the accomplished scholarship make The Flora of the Russian Arctic the most important flora ever published for any part of the Arctic. The flora uses the classification of Engler and Prantl and treats some 360 genera, 1650 species, and 220 infra-specific taxa, mostly subspecies. Also included are descriptions of many new species and subspecies and numerous new combinations.

Update as February 2013:
There is no information at present on the publication of volumes 4-6.