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Academic & Professional Books  Botany  Mycology

Atlas of Wood Decaying Fungi of Central India

By: CK Tiwari(Author), Jagrati Parihar(Author), RK Verma(Author), U Prakasham(Author), VK Bahuguna(Foreword By)
166 pages, 194 colour photos & b/w illustrations
Atlas of Wood Decaying Fungi of Central India
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About this book

Language: English

A total of 2783 specimens of wood-decaying fungi were collected from wood depots and forests of Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Maharashtra and Orissa, on 86 woods of tree species. From these collections, 191 species of wood-decaying fungi were identified. The identified fungi were classified under Myxomycetes,, Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes. Out of 191 species, 114 species of wood-decaying fungi collected from Chhattisgarh, 52 species from Madhya Pradesh, 21 species from Orissa and 4 species from the Vidarbha region of Maharashtra. Myxomycetes are rare with three species, followed by Ascomycetes with 22 species each of including 10 species of Xylaria, 8 species of Hypoxylon and with a single species Daldinia, Helvella, and Phlyctaeniella. The majority of fungi belong to Basidiomycetes with 166 species in 28 families.

Amongst Basidiomycetes Phellinus was recorded as the most diverse with eighteen species followed by Trametes and Ganoderma with 17 species each, Polyporus with 7 species, Microporus with 5 species, Daedalea, Hexagonia and Hymenochaete with 4 species each.

Among 86 wood of different tree species the maximum number of fungi were recorded on Shorea robusta (20 species), followed by Tectona grandis (17 species), Anogeissus Iatifolia and Terminalia tomentosa (15 species), Pterocarpus marsupium (14 species), Diospyros melanoxylon (13 species) and Mangifera indica (10 species).

Schizophyllum commune, Trametes cingulata and Flavadon flavus were common to all places and showed maximum frequencies of occurrence.

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By: CK Tiwari(Author), Jagrati Parihar(Author), RK Verma(Author), U Prakasham(Author), VK Bahuguna(Foreword By)
166 pages, 194 colour photos & b/w illustrations
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