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British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published eight times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

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Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

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This Week in Biodiversity News – 31st August

Mariam Salah
Mariam Salah

‘We’ve covered huge swathes of the UK in tarmac’: how roads affect birds. Rarer birds suffer the most from the network that criss-crosses the country, finds a new study, published in Nature Communications, but kerbside life appears to suit some. 

Madagascar giant frog is a new species, but also a deep-fried delicacy. Two species of giant frog in the genus Mantidactylus from Madagascar have attracted researchers’ attention for their very large size. Now, genetic sequencing has enabled scientists to identify a new member of the giant frog genus Mantidactylus. 

Tiny elephant shrew rediscovered in Africa after 50 years. A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity. The creature was found alive and well in Djibouti, a country in the Horn of Africa, during a scientific expedition.

Newly published research, carried out by staff at BTO Scotland, has investigated the response to wintering waterbirds to drones, and shown that they can be easily scared into flight by drone use. Findings show behavioural responses of non-breeding waterbirds to drone approach are associated with flock size and habitat. You can read the results here.