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Academic & Professional Books  Palaeontology  Palaeontology: General

Fishes and the Break-up of Pangea

Edited By: L Cavin, A Longbottom and M Richter
372 pages, Col & b/w figs
Fishes and the Break-up of Pangea
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  • Fishes and the Break-up of Pangea ISBN: 9781862392489 Hardback Apr 2008 Usually dispatched within 1-2 weeks
    £132.00
    #179505
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About this book

This volume, in honour of Peter L. Forey, is about fishes as palaeobiogeographic indicators in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. The last 250 million years in the history of Earth have witnessed the break-up of Pangaea, affecting the biogeography of organisms. Fishes occupy almost all freshwater and marine environments, making them a good tool to assess palaeogeographic models.
The volume begins with studies of Triassic chondrichthyans and lungfishes, with reflections on Triassic palaeogeography. Phylogeny and distribution of Late Jurassic neoselachians and basal teleosts are broached, and are followed by five papers about the Cretaceous, dealing with SE Asian sharks, South American ray-finned fishes and coelacanths, European characiforms, and global fish palaeogeography. Then six papers cover Tertiary subjects, such as bony tongues, eels, cypriniforms and coelacanths.

There is generally a good fit between fish phylogenies and the evolution of the palaeogeographical pattern, although a few discrepancies question details of current palaeogeographic models and/or some aspects of fish phylogeny.

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Edited By: L Cavin, A Longbottom and M Richter
372 pages, Col & b/w figs
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