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Academic & Professional Books  History & Other Humanities  History of Science & Nature

The Botany of Empire in the Long Eighteenth Century

By: Yota Batsaki(Editor), Sarah Burke Cahalan(Editor), Anatole Tchikine(Editor)
398 pages, 174 colour & 7 b/w illustrations, 1 b/w map, 1 table
The Botany of Empire in the Long Eighteenth Century
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  • The Botany of Empire in the Long Eighteenth Century ISBN: 9780884024163 Hardback Dec 2016 Usually dispatched within 4 days
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About this book

The Botany of Empire in the Long Eighteenth Century brings together an international body of scholars working on eighteenth-century botany within the context of imperial expansion. The eighteenth century saw widespread exploration, a tremendous increase in the traffic in botanical specimens, taxonomic breakthroughs, and horticultural experimentation. The contributors to The Botany of Empire in the Long Eighteenth Century compare the impact of new developments and discoveries across several regions, broadening the geographical scope of their inquiries to encompass imperial powers that did not have overseas colonial possessions – such as the Russian, Ottoman, and Qing empires and the Tokugawa shogunate – as well as politically borderline regions such as South Africa, Yemen, and New Zealand.

The essays in The Botany of Empire in the Long Eighteenth Century examine the botanical ambitions of eighteenth-century empires; the figure of the botanical explorer; the links between imperial ambition and the impulse to survey, map, and collect botanical specimens in "new" territories; and the relationships among botanical knowledge, self-representation, and material culture.

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By: Yota Batsaki(Editor), Sarah Burke Cahalan(Editor), Anatole Tchikine(Editor)
398 pages, 174 colour & 7 b/w illustrations, 1 b/w map, 1 table
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