All Shops

Go to British Wildlife

6 issues per year 84 pages per issue Subscription only

British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published six times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

Subscriptions from £25 per year

Conservation Land Management

4 issues per year 44 pages per issue Subscription only

Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

Subscriptions from £18 per year
Academic & Professional Books  Palaeontology  Palaeozoology & Extinctions

The Braincase Anatomy of the Late Cretaceous Dinosaur Alioramus (Theropoda: Tyrannosauroidea)

Journal / Magazine
By: Gabe S Bever(Author), Stephen L Brusatte(Author), Thomas D Carr(Author), Xing Xu(Author), Amy M Balanoff(Author), Mark A Norell(Author)
The Braincase Anatomy of the Late Cretaceous Dinosaur Alioramus (Theropoda: Tyrannosauroidea)
Click to have a closer look
Select version
  • The Braincase Anatomy of the Late Cretaceous Dinosaur Alioramus (Theropoda: Tyrannosauroidea) Paperback Jan 2013 Usually dispatched within 2-4 months
    £15.99
    #208268
Selected version: £15.99
About this book Customer reviews Related titles

About this book

The late Cretaceous tyrannosaurid Alioramus altai is known from a single specimen whose articulated braincase exhibits a nearly unique combination of preservational quality, subadult stage of growth, and morphological complexity.

We use a detailed physical preparation combined with high-resolution computed tomography to provide an expanded description of this braincase that includes details of the neurocranium and its dermal roof, pneumatic recesses and sinuses, cranial endocast, and inner ear cavities. A few notable features include a highly developed rostral tympanic recess marked by three pneumatic fenestrae, a highly pneumatic paroccipital process with both rostral and caudal pneumatic foramina, a prootic fossa housing external foramina for the trigeminal and facial nerves, a well-developed superficial lamina of the prootic, an expanded vestibular cavity, and an osseous labyrinth that is plesiomorphic in appearance.

These observations, set within the currently available comparative context, elucidate numerous neuroanatomical transformations within Tyrannosauroidea and clarify where more data and work are needed. We expand the discussion for the 21 characters from the neurocranium utilized in a recent revision of tyrannosauroid phylogeny, including a listing of which tyrannosauroid taxa can be scored for the primitive and derived states of each character.

Customer Reviews

Journal / Magazine
By: Gabe S Bever(Author), Stephen L Brusatte(Author), Thomas D Carr(Author), Xing Xu(Author), Amy M Balanoff(Author), Mark A Norell(Author)
Current promotions
Best of Winter 2018Harper CollinsOrder your free copy of our 2018 equipment catalogueBritish Wildlife