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Academic & Professional Books  Palaeontology  Palaeontology: General

Acta Zoologica Fennica, Vol. 216: Eurasian Neogene Large Herbivorous Mammals and Climate

Monograph Journal / Magazine
By: J Eronen
72 pages, illus
Acta Zoologica Fennica, Vol. 216: Eurasian Neogene Large Herbivorous Mammals and Climate
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  • Acta Zoologica Fennica, Vol. 216: Eurasian Neogene Large Herbivorous Mammals and Climate ISBN: 9789519481630 Paperback Dec 2006 Usually dispatched within 1-2 weeks
    £38.50
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About this book

The development and changes in the distribution of herbivorous mammal communities during the Neogene is complex. The Eurasian scale environmental patterns reflect the large-scale geographical and climatic patterns. The reorganization of these affects the biome distribution throughout the continent. The distribution of mammal taxa was closely associated with the distribution of biomes. In Eurasia the Neogene development of environments was twofold. The early and middle Miocene that seemed to have been advantageous for mammals was followed by drying of environments during the late Neogene. The mid-latitude drying was the main trend, and it is the combined result of the retreat of the Paratethys, the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau and changes in the ocean currents and temperatures. The common mammals were "driving" the evolution of mammalian communities. During the late Miocene we see the drying affecting more and more regions, and we see changes in the composition of mammalian communities.

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Monograph Journal / Magazine
By: J Eronen
72 pages, illus
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