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Academic & Professional Books  Insects & other Invertebrates  Insects  Butterflies & Moths (Lepidoptera)

Butterflies of the World, Part 44: Nymphalidae XXV: Kallima

Flora / Fauna
By: Peter V Küppers(Author)
32 pages, 24 plates with colour photos
Butterflies of the World, Part 44: Nymphalidae XXV: Kallima
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  • Butterflies of the World, Part 44: Nymphalidae XXV: Kallima ISBN: 978392778375X Paperback Mar 2015 Usually dispatched within 5 days
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About this book

Language: English

This part is the 25th dealing with the family Nymphalidae and describes the genus Kallima.

The butterflies of the genus Kallima Doubleday, 1849 are renowned for their stunning camouflage markings on the under surface which resembles a dead or dry leaf. The senus comprises only seven (eight) species, and is widespread throughout SE-Asia, the Himalayas and southern China. Although the genus seems to be of oriental origin, three species reach the Palaearctic Region.

All Kallima species are strong and rapid fliers which usually inhabit forested country with heavy rainfalls. The butterflies have a liking for rotten fruits and can easily be attracted to such baits.

Morphologically Kallima species are related to the Doleschallia-group with which they share some structures of their genitalia; they also show some similarities to the Oriental genus Mynes Boisduval, 1832.

The early stages of Kallima and Doleschallia C. & R. Felder, 1860 are very similar, as are those of Kallima and Hypolimnas Hübner, 1819. They also feed on the same foodplants, which primarily belong to the Acanthaceae.

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Flora / Fauna
By: Peter V Küppers(Author)
32 pages, 24 plates with colour photos
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