All Shops

Go to British Wildlife

6 issues per year 84 pages per issue Subscription only

British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published six times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

Subscriptions from £25 per year

Conservation Land Management

4 issues per year 44 pages per issue Subscription only

Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

Subscriptions from £18 per year
Academic & Professional Books  Mammals  Marine Mammals  Whales & Dolphins (Cetacea)

Mark Carwardine's Guide to Whale Watching in North America USA, Canada, Mexico

Wildlife Guide
By: Mark Carwardine(Author)
320 pages, ~130 colour photos, colour illustrations, colour distribution maps
Mark Carwardine's Guide to Whale Watching in North America
Click to have a closer look
Select version
  • Mark Carwardine's Guide to Whale Watching in North America ISBN: 9781472930699 Paperback Aug 2017 Usually dispatched within 5 days
    £18.99
    #233597
Selected version: £18.99
About this book Customer reviews Biography Related titles
Images Additional images
Mark Carwardine's Guide to Whale Watching in North AmericaMark Carwardine's Guide to Whale Watching in North AmericaMark Carwardine's Guide to Whale Watching in North AmericaMark Carwardine's Guide to Whale Watching in North America

About this book

Commercial whale-watching began in 1955 in California, when a San Diego fisherman started taking people (for a dollar a time) to see Grey Whales migrating along the coast. Nowadays, 13 million people go whale-watching each year, in 119 different countries around the world. The undisputed hotspot – with more than half of all whale-watchers – is North America.

Mark Carwardine's Guide to Whale Watching in North America is the second in a series aimed at the millions of cetacean addicts around the world. It includes some of the world's ultimate wildlife experiences: tickling friendly grey whales in Mexico's San Ignacio Lagoon, listening to a live concert of singing humpback whales in Hawaii, being surrounded by thousands of dolphins in Monterey Bay, kayaking with pods of Orca off Vancouver Island, snorkelling with Beluga in Hudson Bay, and many more. Mark Carwardine's Guide to Whale Watching in North America covers all the main whale-watching locations in the United States, Canada and Mexico; rich with photography throughout, it also includes sections on how to watch whales (including everything from identification to interpreting behaviour), and a field-guide section covering all the species that can be seen in North American waters.

Mark Carwardine's guide is indispensable for all who love whales in North America, and want to see them.

Customer Reviews

Biography

Whale expert Mark Carwardine has been studying, protecting, photographing and taking people to see whales and dolphins all over the world for 30 years, and has written many books on the subject. He presented the weekly half-hour programme Nature on BBC Radio 4 for many years, co-presented the six-part BBC2 series Last Chance to See (and various spin-offs) with Stephen Fry, and co-presented the six-part BBC2 series Museum of Life. A professional zoologist and best-selling author, he has written a regular column in BBC Wildlife magazine for more than a decade.

Wildlife Guide
By: Mark Carwardine(Author)
320 pages, ~130 colour photos, colour illustrations, colour distribution maps
Current promotions
Best of Winter 2018Handbook of the Bees of the British Isles (2-Volume Set)Order your free copy of our 2018 equipment catalogueBritish Wildlife