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6 issues per year 84 pages per issue Subscription only

British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published six times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

Subscriptions from £25 per year

Conservation Land Management

4 issues per year 44 pages per issue Subscription only

Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

Subscriptions from £18 per year
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Penguin Books

Allen Lane’s well known failure to find a book to read at Exeter St. David’s railway station prompted him to found the now world famous Penguin Books.

The story is a familiar one: how he couldn’t find a book worth reading for the journey home after a meeting with Agatha Christie, and decided it was time to publish the best writing in an affordable format - the first Penguin paperbacks cost six old pence.

The now famous Penguin logo was chosen because it was ‘dignified and flippant’, the design itself based on specially-drawn sketches of Penguins made at London Zoo.

Authors included in the first batch of Penguin paperbacks included Agatha Christie and Ernest Hemingway. Penguin, founded in 1935, has since published many books and many great writers.

A personal pick of Penguin books in the NHBS catalogue might include: Silent Spring by Rachel Carson, one of the most important and influential non-fiction works of the Twentieth Century; Hubbard’s famous Grasses, dated but still definitive, with line drawings of identification features that have not been bettered; Charles Darwin’s The Voyage of the Beagle, a surprisingly accessible account of his famous round-the-world voyage; and Gilbert White’s Natural History of Selborne, the original nature writing classic.

And Gerald Durrell is there too - for many of us a writer who did more than most to stimulate an interest in natural history and the natural world.