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Academic & Professional Books  History & Other Humanities  History of Science & Nature

Reimagining Dinosaurs in Late Victorian and Edwardian Literature How the ‘Terrible Lizard' Became a Transatlantic Cultural Icon

New
By: Richard Fallon(Author)
217 pages, b/w photos, b/w illustrations
Reimagining Dinosaurs in Late Victorian and Edwardian Literature
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  • Reimagining Dinosaurs in Late Victorian and Edwardian Literature ISBN: 9781108834001 Hardback Nov 2021 Usually dispatched within 6 days
    £74.99
    #255028
Price: £74.99
About this book Contents Customer reviews Biography Related titles

About this book

When the term 'dinosaur' was coined in 1842, it referred to fragmentary British fossils. In subsequent decades, American discoveries – including Brontosaurus and Triceratops – proved that these so-called 'terrible lizards' were in fact hardly lizards at all. By the 1910s 'dinosaur' was a household word. Reimagining Dinosaurs in Late Victorian and Edwardian Literature approaches the hitherto unexplored fiction and popular journalism that made this scientific term a meaningful one to huge transatlantic readerships. Unlike previous scholars, who have focused on displays in American museums, Richard Fallon argues that literature was critical in turning these extinct creatures into cultural icons. Popular authors skilfully related dinosaurs to wider concerns about empire, progress, and faith; some of the most prominent, like Arthur Conan Doyle and Henry Neville Hutchinson, also disparaged elite scientists, undermining distinctions between scientific and imaginative writing. The rise of the dinosaurs thus accompanied fascinating transatlantic controversies about scientific authority.

Contents

1. Reclaiming Authority: Henry Neville Hutchinson, Popular Science, and the Construction of the Dinosaur
2. Reinventing Wonderland: Jabberwocks, Grotesque Monsters, and Dinosaurian Maladaptation
3. Rearticulating the Nation: Transatlantic Fiction and the Dinosaurs of Empire
4.Rediscovering Lost Worlds: Arthur Conan Doyle and the Modern Romance of Palaeontology

Customer Reviews

Biography

Richard Fallon is a Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellow at the University of Birmingham.

New
By: Richard Fallon(Author)
217 pages, b/w photos, b/w illustrations
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