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Academic & Professional Books  Mammals  Marine Mammals  Whales & Dolphins (Cetacea)

Whales' Bones of the Nordic Countries, Central and Eastern Europe

Series: Whales' Bones of the World Volume: 4
By: Nicholas Redman(Author)
319 pages, 300 colour & 100 b/w photos, 14 b/w maps
Whales' Bones of the Nordic Countries, Central and Eastern Europe
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  • Whales' Bones of the Nordic Countries, Central and Eastern Europe ISBN: 9780954580054 Hardback Jan 2013 In stock
    £49.99
    #210059
Selected version: £49.99
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About this book

Whales' Bones of the Nordic Countries, Central and Eastern Europe is part of a project that aims to record all the practical and decorative uses to which the huge skulls, jawbones, shoulder blades, vertebrae and ribs of the Blue, Sei, Fin, Right, Minke and Sperm whales have been put anywhere in the world.

These great bones, some of which are the largest of any creature that has ever lived, have been used in all sorts of interesting, unusual and imaginative ways. Jawbone arches are perhaps the best known example, but bones have also been utilised to create elaborate triumphal arches, as gateposts, fencing, boundary markers, cattle-rubbing posts, scrubbing boards, front door steps, bridge balustrades, gravestones, tethering posts for animals, a framework for simple dwellings, foundations for buildings, umbrella stands, chandeliers, railway sleepers, and inn signs; also as seats, stools and benches. They have been displayed inside and outside town halls, castles, houses and churches, in inns, parks, gardens and zoos. They were particularly useful in places where wood was scarce or non-existent. Although they are generally to be found in coastal regions, there are also some far inland, hundreds of kilometres from the sea.

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Series: Whales' Bones of the World Volume: 4
By: Nicholas Redman(Author)
319 pages, 300 colour & 100 b/w photos, 14 b/w maps
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