All Shops

Go to British Wildlife

6 issues per year 84 pages per issue Subscription only

British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published six times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

Subscriptions from £25 per year

Conservation Land Management

4 issues per year 44 pages per issue Subscription only

Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

Subscriptions from £18 per year
Tap cross to close filters
Best of Winter 2018Handbook of the Bees of the British Isles (2-Volume Set)Order your free copy of our 2018 equipment catalogueBritish Wildlife
You are currently shopping in  Academic & Professional Books .
Sort by

Flora of Bhutan

For political and geographical reasons, Bhutan has until very recently remained inaccessible to most botanists from the outside world, and no comprehensive Flora of the country has ever been written.  From 1914 onwards, however, a small number of privileged botanists and horticulturists, mostly British, were able to travel extensively in Bhutan and bring back to Britain large plant collections. The greatest of these collectors were undoubtedly Frank Ludlow and George Sherriff who made seven visits to Bhutan between 1933 and 1950 and amassed over 6000 herbarium specimens as well as large numbers of living plants and seeds. In spite of the considerable collecting activity, almost none of the resulting information has been available to those in Bhutan, such as the forestry department for whom the Flora of British India remains the only reference work. In response to this, the Royal Government of Bhutan commissioned production of this flora which by was completed in 2002.