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Academic & Professional Books  Organismal to Molecular Biology  General Biology

Biological Materials of Marine Origin: Vertebrates

Monograph
By: Hermann Ehrlich(Author)
445 pages, 74 colour & 50 b/w illustrations, 48 colour tables
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Biological Materials of Marine Origin: Vertebrates
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  • Biological Materials of Marine Origin: Vertebrates ISBN: 9789400757295 Hardback Dec 2014 Usually dispatched within 1-2 weeks
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About this book

Biological Materials of Marine Origin: Vertebrates is a source of modern knowledge on biomineralization, biomimetics and materials science with respect to marine vertebrates. For the first time in scientific literature the author gives the most coherent analysis of the nature, origin and evolution of biocomposites and biopolymers isolated from and observed in the broad variety of marine vertebrate organisms (fish, reptilian, birds and mammals) and within their hierarchically organized structural formations. The basic format is that of a major review article, with liberal use of references to original literature. There is a wealth of new and newly synthesized information, including dozens of previously unpublished images of unique marine creatures including extinct, extant and living taxa and their mineralized and un-mineralized structures from nano- to micro – and macroscale. The material is organized effectively along both biological (phyla) and functional lines. Several modern topics e.g. "Biohalite", or "Fish Skin: From Clothing to Tissue Engineering", as well as "Silica-based Minerals in Marine Vertebrates", are never represented and discussed in previously published books. For the first time such current concepts as hierarchical organization of biocomposites and skeletal structures, structural bioscaffolds, biomimetism and bioinspiration as tools for the design of innovative materials are critically analyzed from both biological and materials science point of view using numerous unique examples of marine vertebrate origin. Biological Materials of Marine Origin: Vertebrates reviews the most relevant advances in the marine biological materials research field, pointing out several approaches being introduced and explored by distinct modern laboratories.

The objective of Biological Materials of Marine Origin: Vertebrates is for the scientists as well as for the senior or graduate standing in engineering or science to gain a solid appreciation for the special significance of the word marine biological materials as well as the rapid and exciting evolution and expansion of biomaterials science and its applications in modern technology and medicine.

Contents

Introduction

Species Richness and Diversity of Marine Vertebrates

Part I: Biomaterials of Vertebrates Origin. An Overview

Conclusion

References

Part II: Biomineralization in Marine Vertebrates

2. Cartilage of marine vertebrates

2.1. From non-mineralized to mineralized cartilage

2.1.1. Marine cartilage: Biomechanics and Material Properties

2.1.2. Marine cartilage: Tissue Engineering

2.1.3. Shark cartilage: Medical Aspect

2.1.4. Conclusion

References

3. Biocomposites and Mineralized Tissues

3.1. Bone

3.1.1. Whale Bone: Size, Chemistry And Material Properties

3.1.2. Whale Bone Haus

3.1.3. Conclusion

References

3.3. Tooth

3.3.1. Tooth-Like Structures

3.3.2. Keratinized Teeth

3.3.3. Rostral Teeth

3.3.4. Pharyngeal Denticles And Teeth

3.3.5. Extra-Oral And Extra-Mandibular Teeth

3.3.6. Vertebrate Oral Teeth

3.3.6.1. Folded Teeth

3.3.6.2. Hypermineralized Tooth Plates

3.3.6.3. Shark Teeth

3.3.6.4. Whale Teeth

3.3.6.5. Narwhal Tusk

3.3.6.6. Walrus Tusk

3.3.7. Conclusion

References

3.4. Otoconia And Otoliths

3.4.1. Chemistry and Biochemistry Of Otoconia And Otoliths

3.4.2. Practical Applications Of The Fish Otoliths

3.4.3. Conclusion

References

3.5. Egg Shells Of Marine Vertebrates

3.5.1. Egg Shells Of Marine Reptilia

3.5.2. Egg Shells Of Sea Birds

3.5.3. Conclusion

References

3.6. Biomagnetite in Marine Vertebrates

3.6.1. Magnetite in Marine Fish

3.6.2. Magnetite in Marine Reptiles

3.6.3. Magnetite in Sea Birds

3.6.4. Magnetite in Cetaceans

3.6.5. Conclusion

References

3.7. Biohalite

3.7.1. Diversity and Origin of Salt Glands in Marine Vertebrates

3.7.2. Salt Glands: From Anatomy To Cellular Level

3.7.3. Conclusion

References

3.8. Pathological Biomineralization in Marine Vertebrates

3.8.1. Conclusion

References

3.9. Silica-based Minerals in Marine Vertebrates

3.9.1. Conclusion

References

Part III: Marine Fishes as Source of Unique Biocomposites

4. Fish Scales as Mineral-based Composites

4.1. Enamel and Enameloid

4.2. Dentine and Dentine-based Composite

4.3. Fish Scales, Scutes And Denticles: Diversity And Structure

4.4. Conclusion

References

5. Materials Design Principles of Fish Scales and Armor

5.1. Biomechanics of Fish Scales

5.2. Fish Swimming And The Surface Shape Of Fish Scale

5.2.1 Superoleophobicity of Fish Scale Surfaces

5.2.2 Selfcleaning of Fish Scales and Biomimetic Applitions

5.3. Conclusion

References

6. Fish Skin: From Clothing to Tissue Engineering

6.1. Fish Skin Clothing and Leather

6.2. Shagreen

6.3. Fish Scales and Skin as Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

6.4. Conclusion

References

7. Fish Fins and Rays as Inspiration for Materials Engineering and Robotics

7.1. Fish Fins and Rays: Diversity, Structure and Function

7.1.1. Fish Wings: Fins of Flying Fish

7.2. Fish Fin Spines and Rays

7.3. Chemistry of Fish Fin: Elastoidin

7.4. Fin Regeneration and Fin Cell Culture

7.5. Robotic Fish-Like Devices

7.5.1. Fish and Designing of Smart Materials

7.5.2. Fish Biorobotics

7.6. Conclusion

References

Part IV: Marine Biopolymers of Vertebrate Origin

8. Marine Collagens

8.1. Isolation and properties of fish collagens

8.2. Fish collagen as Biomaterial

8.3. Conclusion

References

9. Marine Gelatins

9.1. Fish Gelatin-based Films

9.2. Shark skin and Cartilage Gelatin

9.3. Conclusion

References

10. Marine Elastin

10.1. Elastin-like Proteins in Lamprey

10.2. Fish Elastin

10.3. Cetacean Elastin

10.4. Conclusion

References

11. Marine Keratins

11.1. Intermediate Filaments

11.2. Hagfish Slime

11.3. Whale Baleen

11.4. Conclusion

References

12. Egg-capsule Proteins of Selachians

12.1. Collagen

12.2. Polyphenol-containing Proteins

12.3. Conclusion

References

13. Marine Structural Proteins in Biomedicine and Tissue Engineering

13.1. Conclusion

References

Epilogue

References

Addendum

8. Marine Collagens

8.1. Isolation and properties of fish collagens

8.2. Fish collagen as Biomaterial

8.3. Conclusion

References

9. Marine Gelatins

9.1. Fish Gelatin-based Films

9.2. Shark skin and Cartilage Gelatin

9.3. Conclusion

References

10. Marine Elastin

10.1. Elastin-like Proteins in Lamprey

10.2. Fish Elastin

10.3. Cetacean Elastin

10.4. Conclusion

References

11. Marine Keratins

11.1. Intermediate Filaments

11.2. Hagfish Slime

11.3. Whale Baleen

11.4. Conclusion

References

12. Egg-capsule Proteins of Selachians

12.1. Collagen

12.2. Polyphenol-containing Proteins

12.3. Conclusion

References

13. Marine Structural Proteins in Biomedicine and Tissue Engineering

13.1. Conclusion

References

Epilogue

References

 

Customer Reviews

Monograph
By: Hermann Ehrlich(Author)
445 pages, 74 colour & 50 b/w illustrations, 48 colour tables
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
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