All Shops

Go to British Wildlife

6 issues per year 84 pages per issue Subscription only

British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published six times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

Subscriptions from £25 per year

Conservation Land Management

4 issues per year 44 pages per issue Subscription only

Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

Subscriptions from £18 per year
Academic & Professional Books  Conservation & Biodiversity  Conservation & Biodiversity: General

Biologisch-Ökologische Grundlagen des Schutzes Gefährdeter Segetalpflanzen [Biological-Ecological Bases of Protection of Endangered Weeds]

By: Christian Schneider(Author), Ulrich Sukopp(Author), Herbert Sukopp(Author)
356 pages, b/w illustrations, b/w maps, b/w distribution maps, tables
Biologisch-Ökologische Grundlagen des Schutzes Gefährdeter Segetalpflanzen [Biological-Ecological Bases of Protection of Endangered Weeds]
Click to have a closer look
Select version
  • Biologisch-Ökologische Grundlagen des Schutzes Gefährdeter Segetalpflanzen [Biological-Ecological Bases of Protection of Endangered Weeds] ISBN: 9783784320779 Paperback Dec 1994 Usually dispatched within 1-2 weeks
    £26.99
    #135724
Selected version: £26.99
About this book Customer reviews Related titles
Images Additional images
Biologisch-Ökologische Grundlagen des Schutzes Gefährdeter Segetalpflanzen [Biological-Ecological Bases of Protection of Endangered Weeds]Biologisch-Ökologische Grundlagen des Schutzes Gefährdeter Segetalpflanzen [Biological-Ecological Bases of Protection of Endangered Weeds]Biologisch-Ökologische Grundlagen des Schutzes Gefährdeter Segetalpflanzen [Biological-Ecological Bases of Protection of Endangered Weeds]Biologisch-Ökologische Grundlagen des Schutzes Gefährdeter Segetalpflanzen [Biological-Ecological Bases of Protection of Endangered Weeds]

About this book

Language: German with English summary

For the last fifteen years Germany has attempted to protect its endangered arable weeds. The eastem part of the country (formerly GDR) achieves this with fields kept as nature reserves, which are protected by law and managed according to traditional agricultural methods, whereas westem Germany favours field border strips, land of several meters on the edges of the fields, which apart from a ban on weed control and fertilization is managed as intensively as the adjacent land. Weeds are less effectively protected in this system. Basing our study on the biological and ecological prerequisites of endangered arable weeds, we have tried to show that every aspect of modem intensive farming has greatly contributed to their decline and would suggest that conservation procedures should be equally far-reaching. Today in Germany, 134 of the 350 arable weeds of Central Europe are extinct, endangered or rare (Table 1-1). Emphasis is placed on weeds growing in cereal crops (”cornfield weeds“, 109 species) and their preservation requirements.

In Chapter 3, 10 species are described. Taking into account their biological characteristics and habitat requirements, the causes of their decline are analysed and the necessary measures for their preservation suggested. Apart from a ban on weed control and fertilization, crop rotation and cereal density must be modified and stubble should be left unworked.

To show the relative importance of these preservation measures, biological and ecological data for many endangered arable weeds are listed in Chapter 4: native and introduced field weeds (Table 4-1, 4-2), seed weight (Table 4-4), germination depth (Table 4-5), mean seed output (Table 4-6), speirochoric weeds (Table 4-7), germination and seed ripening time (Table 4-9), life cycles (Table 4-11), and susceptibility to growth regulator herbicides (Table 4-12).

In Chapter 5 conservation requirements are summed up. The genetic variability of endangered arable weeds can only be sustained on sites managed as farmland which is worked in a traditional way. It is highly important that existing populations are protected and their whereabouts recorded as soon as possible. Apart from speirochoric species, endangered cornfield weeds can be conserved if no herbicides are used and if stubble is left untouched after harvesting. When these conditions are fulfilled such weeds may survive at least on the field margins. This minimal survival habitat can be enhanced by avoiding dense cereal stands. These three measures should suffice for long-term conservation providing one ensures that there is neither set-aside nor perennial cultures. To improve protection in field border strips agreement must be reached with farmers on these points. However, even then protection will not be total, because certain aspects of intensive farming must be retained. Total protection is only possible in field nature reserves but their management is complicated and long-term. As field border strips are more easily established the conservation of endangered arable weeds is more likely to take place in this way. Field border strips and field nature reserves complement each other and should be treated in the same context.

Customer Reviews

By: Christian Schneider(Author), Ulrich Sukopp(Author), Herbert Sukopp(Author)
356 pages, b/w illustrations, b/w maps, b/w distribution maps, tables
Current promotions
Best of Winter 2018Harper CollinsOrder your free copy of our 2018 equipment catalogueBritish Wildlife