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Academic & Professional Books  History & Other Humanities  History of Science & Nature

Charles Darwin's Debt to the Romantics How Alexander von Humboldt, Goethe and Wordsworth Helped Shape Darwin's View of Nature

New
By: Charles Morris Lansley(Author)
274 pages, 10 illustrations
Charles Darwin's Debt to the Romantics
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  • Charles Darwin's Debt to the Romantics ISBN: 9781787071384 Hardback Jul 2018 Usually dispatched within 6 days
    £74.99
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About this book

This book argues that the Romantic movement influenced Charles Darwin and his theory of natural selection. Given that Darwin has traditionally been placed within Victorian naturalism, these Romantic connections have often been overlooked. The volume traces specific examples of Darwin's reliance on the Romantics – such as Alexander von Humboldt's Personal Narrative, which he took with him on the Beagle, and the poetry of William Wordsworth, discussed in his notebooks – and explores correlations in Darwin's own writings. When Darwin refers to the «archetype» in Origin, could he be drawing on Goethe's own use of the concept? And how to explain his description of all poetry as creating a feeling of "nausea"? In addition to these key figures, Charles Darwin's Debt to the Romantics also explores the possible influence of Darwin's own grandfather, Erasmus Darwin. The book cleverly follows Darwin's form of the narrative in a search for traces of history in both science and poetry, inspired by the unique imagination of Darwin himself.

Customer Reviews

New
By: Charles Morris Lansley(Author)
274 pages, 10 illustrations
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