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British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published eight times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

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Academic & Professional Books  Evolutionary Biology  Human Evolution & Anthropology

Future Humans Inside the Science of Our Continuing Evolution

By: Scott Solomon(Author)
NHBS
Are humans still subject to the forces of evolution? An evolutionary biologist provides surprising insights into the future of Homo sapiens
Future Humans
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  • Future Humans ISBN: 9780300208719 Hardback Dec 2016 Usually dispatched within 5 days
    £19.99
    #233897
Price: £19.99
About this book Customer reviews Biography Related titles

About this book

In this intriguing book, evolutionary biologist Scott Solomon draws on the explosion of discoveries in recent years to examine the future evolution of our species. Combining knowledge of our past with current trends, Solomon offers convincing evidence that evolutionary forces still affect us today. But how will modernization – including longer lifespans, changing diets, global travel, and widespread use of medicine and contraceptives – affect our evolutionary future?

Solomon presents an entertaining and accessible review of the latest research on human evolution in modern times, drawing on fields from genomics to medicine and the study of our microbiome. Surprising insights, on topics ranging from the rise of online dating and Cesarean sections to the spread of diseases such as HIV and Ebola, suggest that we are entering a new phase in human evolutionary history – one that makes the future less predictable and more interesting than ever before.

Customer Reviews

Biography

Scott Solomon is an evolutionary biologist and science writer. He teaches ecology, evolutionary biology, and scientific communication at Rice University, where he is a Professor in the Practice in the Department of BioSciences. He lives in Houston, TX.

By: Scott Solomon(Author)
NHBS
Are humans still subject to the forces of evolution? An evolutionary biologist provides surprising insights into the future of Homo sapiens
Media reviews

"When it comes to evolution, the question everyone often asks is, "Where is it going?" In Future Humans, Scott Solomon brings the latest scientific research to bear on that question. This book is a fascinating excursion through natural selection in our own time, and what it may mean for the future."
– Carl Zimmer, author of Parasite Rex and Evolution: Making Sense of Life

"Clearly written and beautifully motivated by human interest stories, this is a book I will recommend enthusiastically to students and friends. His message is important."
– Stephen Stearns, author of Evolution: An Introduction

"Future Humans is a short, clear, crisply written book about the ways in which our species has evolved in the past, is currently evolving, and may evolve in the future. By rigorously summarizing the numerous contrary arguments, Solomon provides a most useful service."
– Christopher Wills, evolutionary biologist at the University of California, San Diego and author of Children of Prometheus: The Accelerating Pace of Human Evolution

"It is enjoyable and well-researched, and beautifully clarifies the fact that larger populations, greater genetic interchange and ever-older breeding males all greatly increase what evolution has to work with."
– Adrian Burnett, New Scientist

 

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