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Academic & Professional Books  Botany  Economic Botany & Ethnobotany

How Carrots Won the Trojan War Curious (but True) Stories of Common Vegetables

Popular Science
By: Rebecca Rupp
376 pages, colour illustrations
How Carrots Won the Trojan War
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  • How Carrots Won the Trojan War ISBN: 9781603429689 Paperback Oct 2011 Usually dispatched within 6 days
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About this book

Vegetables are more than just food for humans: they've been characters, companions, and even protagonists throughout history. "How Carrots Won the Trojan War" is a delightful collection of little-known stories about the origins, legends, and historical significance of 23 of the world's most popular vegetables. Curious cooks, devoted gardeners, and casual readers alike will be fascinated by the far-fetched tales of their favourite foods' pasts. Readers will discover why Roman gladiators were massaged with onion juice before battle, how celery contributed to Casanova's conquests, how peas almost poisoned General Washington, why some seventeenth-century turnips were considered degenerate, and, of course, how carrots helped the Greeks win the Trojan War.

Customer Reviews

Popular Science
By: Rebecca Rupp
376 pages, colour illustrations
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