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Good Reads  Environmental & Social Studies  Climate Change

How to Talk About Climate Change in a Way That Makes a Difference

By: Rebecca Huntley(Author)
How to Talk About Climate Change in a Way That Makes a Difference
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  • How to Talk About Climate Change in a Way That Makes a Difference ISBN: 9781911632764 Paperback Jan 2020 Usually dispatched within 1 week
    £16.99
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Price: £16.99
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How to Talk About Climate Change in a Way That Makes a DifferenceHow to Talk About Climate Change in a Way That Makes a DifferenceHow to Talk About Climate Change in a Way That Makes a DifferenceHow to Talk About Climate Change in a Way That Makes a Difference

About this book

Why is it so hard to talk about the future of our Earth? Rebecca Huntley's book explores why the key to progress on climate change is in the psychology of human attitudes and our ability to change.

While scientists double down on the shocking figures, we still find ourselves unable to discuss climate change meaningfully among friends and neighbours – or even to grapple with it ourselves.

The key to progress on climate change is in the psychology of human attitudes and our ability to change. Whether you're already alarmed and engaged with the issue, concerned but disengaged, a passive skeptic or an active denier, understanding our emotional reactions to climate change – why it makes us anxious, fearful, angry or detached – is critical to coping on an individual level and convincing each other to act.

How to Talk About Climate Change in a Way That Makes a Difference is about understanding why people who aren't like you feel the way they do and learning to talk to them effectively. What we need are thousands – millions – of everyday conversations about the climate to enlarge the ranks of the concerned, engage the disengaged and persuade the cautious of the need for action.

Contents

Introduction: A change of heart, or How I became emotional about climate change
Chapter 1: The problem with reason, or Why we need to stop arguing about science
Chapter 2: Start being emotional, or The importance of feelings over facts
Chapter 3: Green girls, or What we can learn from teens about how to talk about climate
Chapter 4: Guilt, or My plastic coffee cup killed the green sea turtle
Chapter 5: Fear, or Do wildfires change minds and votes?
Chapter 6: Anger is my frenemy
Chapter 7: Denial, or The need to be innocent
Chapter 8: Despair, or The support group at the end of the world
Chapter 9: Hope, or How to get out of bed in the morning
Chapter 10: Loss, or Bury me in a carbon sink
Chapter 11: Love, or Do it for the birds
Conclusion: It's the right time to talk about climate change

Acknowledgments
Notes
Further reading and resources
Index

Customer Reviews

Biography

Rebecca Huntley is one of Australia's most experienced social researchers and former director of The Mind and Mood Report, the longest running measure of the nation's attitudes and trends. She holds degrees in law and film studies and a PhD in gender studies, and is a mum to three young children. It was realising she is part of the problem older generation that caused her change of heart and to dedicate herself to researching our attitudes to climate change. She is a member of Al Gore's Climate Reality Corps, carries out social research for NGOs such as The Wilderness Society and WWF, and writes and presents for the ABC. This is her sixth book.

By: Rebecca Huntley(Author)
Media reviews

"Balancing personal anecdotes and a survey of environmental activism at large, Huntley tackles big ideas and tough emotions with sympathy and curiosity. This fresh approach to a familiar topic is a welcome contribution to the climate conversation."
Publishers Weekly

"Rebecca Huntley has given us a great gift: an essential guide to understanding ourselves and each other as we face the climate crisis. Let's take down the walls that divide us. Collectively, with compassion and courage, we can make real change happen."
– Kylie Kwong

"Explains whether and how we will choose to solve the climate problem. Immensely important analysis in a great read."
– Professor Ross Garnaut

"Balancing personal anecdotes and a survey of environmental activism at large, Huntley tackles big ideas and tough emotions with sympathy and curiosity. This fresh approach to a familiar topic is a welcome contribution to the climate conversation."
Publishers Weekly

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