All Shops

Go to British Wildlife

6 issues per year 84 pages per issue Subscription only

British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published six times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

Subscriptions from £25 per year

Conservation Land Management

4 issues per year 44 pages per issue Subscription only

Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

Subscriptions from £18 per year
Academic & Professional Books  Environmental & Social Studies  Pollution & Remediation  Effects of Contaminants

The Case Against Fluoride How Hazardous Waste Ended Up in Our Drinking Water and the Bad Science and Powerful Politics That Keep it There

By: Paul Connett, James Beck and H S Micklem
384 pages, figs, tabs
Publisher: Chelsea Green
The Case Against Fluoride
Click to have a closer look
Select version
  • The Case Against Fluoride ISBN: 9781603582872 Paperback Dec 2010 Usually dispatched within 6 days
    £19.95
    #190772
Selected version: £19.95
About this book Customer reviews Biography Related titles

About this book

When the US Public Health Service endorsed water fluoridation in 1959, there was little evidence of its safety. Now, six decades later and after most countries have rejected the practice, more than 70 per cent of Americans, as well as 200 million people worldwide, are drinking fluoridated water. The Centre for Disease Control and the American Dental Association continue to promote it - and even support mandatory state-wide water fluoridation - despite increasing evidence that it is not only unnecessary, but potentially hazardous to humans.

In this book, the authors take a new look at the science behind water fluoridation and argue that just because the dental and medical establishments endorse a public health measure does not mean it is safe. And from an ethical standpoint, they say, water fluoridation is a bad medical practice: individuals are being forced to take medication without their informed consent; there is no control over the dose and no monitoring of possible side effects.

Customer Reviews

Biography

Dr Paul Connett, Professor Emeritus of Environmental Chemistry at St Lawrence University, has given more than 2000 presentations on the issue of waste management. He holds a bachelor's degree from the University of Cambridge and a PhD in chemistry from Dartmouth College. He is currently the director of the Fluoride Action Network and lives in Canton, New York.

Dr James Beck is Professor Emeritus of Medical Biophysics at the University of Calgary and holds a doctorate in medicine from Washington University School of Medicine and biophysics from the University of California Berkeley. he lives in Calgary, Canada.

Dr H. Spedding Micklem is a Professor Emeritus in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. He holds a DPhil from the University of Oxford. Dr Micklem lives in Edinburgh.
By: Paul Connett, James Beck and H S Micklem
384 pages, figs, tabs
Publisher: Chelsea Green
Media reviews
This volume will quickly become the most trusted compendium of evidence and argument critical of fluoridation worldwide - and quite right too. The Scientific & Medical Network - Feb 2011 "If you are interested in the fluoride debate you should read this book. However, more importantly, if you are disinterested in the fluoridation of drinking water or are strongly pro-fluoridation, you must also read it." Caduceus - February 2011
Current promotions
Best of Winter 2018Harper CollinsOrder your free copy of our 2018 equipment catalogueBritish Wildlife