All Shops

Go to British Wildlife

6 issues per year 84 pages per issue Subscription only

British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published six times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

Subscriptions from £25 per year

Conservation Land Management

4 issues per year 44 pages per issue Subscription only

Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

Subscriptions from £18 per year
Academic & Professional Books  Organismal to Molecular Biology  Ethology

The Evolution of Dialogue: From Microorganisms to Man [Russian]

Monograph
By: Evgeniy N Panov(Author)
400 pages, b/w photos, b/w illustrations, tables
The Evolution of Dialogue: From Microorganisms to Man [Russian]
Click to have a closer look
Select version
  • The Evolution of Dialogue: From Microorganisms to Man [Russian] ISBN: 9785955106915 Hardback Jan 2014 Usually dispatched within 1-2 months
    £85.99
    #225935
Selected version: £85.99
About this book Customer reviews Related titles
Images Additional images
The Evolution of Dialogue: From Microorganisms to Man [Russian]The Evolution of Dialogue: From Microorganisms to Man [Russian]

About this book

Language: Russian

This book, aimed at the professional ethologist, charts the rise of efficiency of signaling systems in organic evolution – in parallel with the formation of new material preconditions for this, such as the establishment in certain groups of fauna of advanced senses of vision and hearing. Secondly, it traces the historical changes in the views of experts, specifically the disappearance of some of their illusions about the equivalence of language behavior of humans and animals, as happened, in particular, in the history of the study of the so-called "dance language" of bees.

Furthermore, this book looks at pair-formation of Variable Wheatear Oenanthe picata and singing intensity of Finsch’s Wheatear O. finschii. Further topics covered include territorial and courtship behaviour of Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius and the importance of maintaining individual distance; aggression between the sexes in two species of sparrows Passer; babblers Turdoides spp. as contact species which form groups in which allopreening is regular. Mention may also be made of optical signals in display-flights of raptor pairs; song structure illustrated by sonogram; the ontogeny of vocalizations; song learning how and when; imitative song; dialects (notably in Yellowhammer Emberiza citrinella); duetting in Laniarius shrikes; the organizations of song cycles; the role of memory in the organization of singing behaviour; and the information content of birds’ acoustic signals.

Summary in Russian:
В книге с позиции профессионального этолога рассмотрен, во-первых, ход нарастания эффективности сигнальных систем в эволюции органического мира – параллельно с формированием новых материальных предпосылок к этому, таких как становление в тех или иных группах животного мира высокоразвитых функций зрения и слуха. Во-вторых, прослежены исторические изменения во взглядах специалистов-зоологов на сущность сигнализации животных. Имеется в виду постепенный уход от иллюзии о некой их равнозначности языковому поведению человека, как это произошло, в частности, в истории изучения так называемого "языка танцев" пчел.

Customer Reviews

Monograph
By: Evgeniy N Panov(Author)
400 pages, b/w photos, b/w illustrations, tables
Current promotions
Best of Winter 2018Handbook of the Bees of the British Isles (2-Volume Set)Order your free copy of our 2018 equipment catalogueBritish Wildlife