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British Wildlife

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British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published eight times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

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Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

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Academic & Professional Books  Natural History  General Natural History

The Natural History of Unicorns

Popular Science
By: Chris Lavers
258 pages, illus
Publisher: Granta
The Natural History of Unicorns
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  • The Natural History of Unicorns ISBN: 9781847081179 Paperback Jan 2010 Usually dispatched within 6 days
    £8.99
    #184609
  • The Natural History of Unicorns ISBN: 9781847080622 Hardback Jan 2009 Out of Print #177312
Selected version: £8.99
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About this book

For centuries, unicorns have inspired, enchanted and eluded humanity. The beast appears in the Old Testament and there was a brisk trade in unicorn parts in medieval times, with travellers regularly reporting sightings into the modern era. But by the early 20th century scientists had conceded that the unicorn never existed. It turns out they were a little hasty. Where did the unicorn come from, and how was it accepted as a part of the animal kingdom for so long?

Chris Lavers argues that although the unicorn of our imagination isn't real, traces of its character can be found in existing species. In this lively and vivid exploration of the natural world, Lavers follows the beast's trail to the plateaus of India and into the jungles of Africa to unearth the flesh and blood ancestors of our iconic unicorn.

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Biography

Chris Lavers is a lecturer in the School of Geography, University of Nottingham. He is the author of Why Elepahnts Have Big Ears (2000), which has been translated into several languages. He has written for the Spectator, New Statesman and the Guardian. He publishes in scientific and historical journals in the fields of animal and plant ecology and natural history.