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Academic & Professional Books  Marine & Freshwater Biology  Marine Biology  Marine Fauna & Flora

Tropical Deep-Sea Benthos, Volume 26 Deep Water Pyramidelloidea of the Tropical South Pacific: Turbonilla and Related Genera

By: Anselmo Peñas(Editor), Emilio Rolán(Editor)
436 pages, 156 figs
Tropical Deep-Sea Benthos, Volume 26
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  • Tropical Deep-Sea Benthos, Volume 26 ISBN: 9782856536421 Hardback Dec 2010 In stock
    £67.99
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Tropical Deep-Sea Benthos, Volume 26Tropical Deep-Sea Benthos, Volume 26

About this book

The Pyramidellidae are a species-rich family of small gastropods which live as ectoparasites on other marine invertebrates. Their subtle variations around a quite homogenous basic morphology make species-level taxonomy extremely difficult. This volume contains the descriptions of 272 species collected in the last 30 years of deep-sea benthic exploration promoted by MNHN and IRD scientists. More than three-quarters of the species are new to science, and more is to come with the other genera to be studied following Turbonilla.

This paper takes a step forward towards answering some questions regarding the mega-diverse Indo-Pacific. What is really the order of magnitude of species richness? How are numbers of individuals distributed among species? How heterogeneous is the fauna on a geographic scale?

Anselmo Penas and Emilio Rolan have a considerable background in malacology, mostly European and Eastern Atlantic. Their venture with the Pyramidellidae started with the European and West African species, in a series of papers which appeared in the Spanish malacological journal Iberus, in which new species appeared by the dozens. The move to the Indo-Pacific goes up one order of magnitude, and only the great XIX century expeditions match similar numbers of new species introduced in a single paper.

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