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British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published six times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

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Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

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Academic & Professional Books  Environmental & Social Studies  Natural Resource Use & Depletion  Agriculture & Food

Where does the Carbon Footprint Fall? Developing a Carbon Map of Food Production

By: Katharina Plassmann and Gareth Edward-Jones
34 pages, Figs, tabs, maps
Where does the Carbon Footprint Fall?
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  • Where does the Carbon Footprint Fall? ISBN: 9781843697510 Paperback Jul 2009 Usually dispatched within 3 days
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About this book Customer reviews Related titles

About this book

The concept of local food is appealing to many consumers. But it is difficult to define what actually constitutes local food. Given the globalised nature of agricultural markets, bread baked in a small village bakery in England may be made from grain grown in Canada. Similarly, many of the inputs to a West Country dairy farm selling local ice cream may come from outside the UK.

One of the purported advantages of local food relates to reduced greenhouse gas emissions from the food chain. This concept was initially encapsulated by measuring food miles, but recently more comprehensive life cycle assessments and carbon footprints have been developed.

This report advances the discussion about defining the local by examining the geographical location of GHG emissions along the supply chains upstream of two case study farms. The resulting carbon map illustrates the amount and location of the GHG emissions related to the provision of inputs and on-farm processes, and enables characterisation of the localness of the two farm systems.

Customer Reviews

By: Katharina Plassmann and Gareth Edward-Jones
34 pages, Figs, tabs, maps
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