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Academic & Professional Books  Natural History  General Natural History

Local Science vs. Global Science Approaches to Indigenous Knowledge in International Development

Edited By: Paul Sillitoe
296 pages, 14 figs, 9 tables
Local Science vs. Global Science
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  • Local Science vs. Global Science ISBN: 9781845456481 Paperback Jul 2009 Usually dispatched within 6 days
    £22.99
    #179556
  • Local Science vs. Global Science ISBN: 9781845450144 Hardback Mar 2007 Usually dispatched within 6 days
    £53.00
    #159315
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About this book

While science has achieved a remarkable understanding of nature, affording humans an astonishing technological capability, it has led, through Euro-American global domination, to the muting of other cultural views and values, even threatening their continued existence. There is a growing realization that the diversity of knowledge systems demand respect, some refer to them in a conservation idiom as alternative information banks. The scientific perspective is only one. We now have many examples of the soundness of local science and practices, some previously considered "primitive" and in need of change, but this book goes beyond demonstrating the soundness of local science and arguing for the incorporation of others' knowledge in development, to argue that we need to look critically at the foundations of science itself and further challenge its hegemony, not only over local communities in Africa, Asia, the Pacific or wherever, but also the global community. The issues are large and the challenges are exciting, as addressed in this book, in a range of ethnographic and institutional contexts.

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Biography

Paul Sillitoe is Professor of Anthropology, Durham University. His research interests focus on natural resources management, appropriate technology, and development. He specialises in social and environmental change, sustainable livelihoods, human ecology and ethno-science. He has long-standing interests in the Pacific, and more recently in South Asia. He seeks to further the incorporation of local knowledge in development, having experience with several international development agencies.
Edited By: Paul Sillitoe
296 pages, 14 figs, 9 tables
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