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Academic & Professional Books  Mammals  Primates

Monkeys on the Edge Ecology and Management of Long-Tailed Macaques and their Interface with Humans

By: Michael Gumert(Editor), Lisa Jones-Engel(Editor), Agustín Fuentes(Author), David Quammen(Foreword By)
360 pages, 55 illustrations, 28 tables
Monkeys on the Edge
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  • Monkeys on the Edge ISBN: 9780521764339 Hardback Apr 2011 Usually dispatched within 6 days
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About this book Contents Customer reviews Biography Related titles

About this book

Long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) have a wide geographical distribution and extensively overlap with human societies across southeast Asia, regularly utilizing the edges of secondary forest and inhabiting numerous anthropogenic environments, including temple grounds, cities and farmlands. Yet despite their apparent ubiquity across the region, there are striking gaps in our understanding of long-tailed macaque population ecology. This timely volume, a key resource for primatologists, anthropologists and conservationists, underlines the urgent need for comprehensive population studies on common macaques.

Providing the first detailed look at research on this underexplored species, it unveils what is currently known about the population of M. fascicularis, explores the contexts and consequences of human-macaque sympatry and discusses the innovative programs being initiated to resolve human-macaque conflict across Asia. Spread throughout Monkeys on the Edge are boxed case studies that supplement the chapters and give a valuable insight into specific field studies on wild M. fascicularis populations.

Contents

Foreword David Quamman
Preface
Acknowledgements

Part I. The Status and Distribution of Long-Tailed Macaques
1. The common monkey of southeast Asia: long-tailed macaque populations, ethnophoresy, and their occurrence in human environments Michael D. Gumert; Box
2. Distribution and current status of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea) in Myanmar Aye Mi San and Yuzuru Hamada; Box
3. Distribution and present status of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Laos and their ecological relationship with rhesus macaques (M. mulatta) Yuzuru Hamada, Hiroyuki Kurita, Shunji Goto, Yoshiki Morimitsu, Suchinda Malaivijitnond, Sitideth Pathonton, Bounnam Pathontone, Phouthone Kingsada, Chanda Vongsombath, Fong Samouth and Bounthob Praxaysombath; Box

Part II. The Human-Macaque Interface
4. Campus monkeys of University Kebangsaan Malaysia: nuisance problems and students' perceptions Badrul Munir Md-Zain, Mohamed Reza Tarmizi and Mastura Mohd Zaki
5. Human impact on long-tailed macaques in Thailand Suchinda Malaivijitnond, Yolanda Vazquez and Yuzuru Hamada
6. Macaque behavior at the human-monkey interface: the activity and demography of semi-free ranging Macaca fascicularis at Padangtegal, Bali, Indonesia Agustin Fuentes; Box
7. The role of M. fascicularis in infectious agent transmission Gregory Engel and Lisa Jones-Engel

Part III. Ethnophoresy of Long-Tailed Macaques
8. Macaca fascicularis in Mauritius: implications for macaque-human interactions and for future research on long-tailed macaques Robert Sussman, Christopher A. Shaffer and Lisa Guidi
9. Macaca fascicularis in Mauritius: a pest funding conservation projects Nada Padayatchy
10. Ethnophoresy: the exotic macaques on Ngeaur Island, Republic of Palua Bruce P. Wheatley

Part IV. Comparisons with Rhesus Macaques
11. India's rhesus populations: protectionism vs. conservation management Charles Southwick and M. Farooq Siddiqi; Box

Part V. Understanding and Managing the Human-Macaque Interface
12. Developing sustainable human-macaque communities Lisa Jones-Engel, Gregory Engel, Michael D. Gumert and Agustin Fuentes; Box
13. Future directions for research and conservation of long-tailed macaque populations Michael D. Gumert, Agustin Fuentes, Gregory Engel and Lisa Jones-Engel

Index

Customer Reviews

Biography

Michael D. Gumert is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Psychology at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, where he leads a field program investigating the behavioral biology and ecology of Macaca fascicularis in Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand. Recent research focuses on practical issues facing long-tailed macaque populations and he has organized international experts in a cooperative group to better understand the conservation and management needs of long-tailed macaques.

Agustin Fuentes is Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts at the University of Notre Dame. His current research projects include assessing behavior, ecology and pathogen transmission in human-monkey interactions in Southeast Asia and Gibraltar and examining the roles of cooperation, social negotiation and niche construction in primate and human evolution.

Lisa Jones-Engel is a Senior Research Scientist at the Washington National Primate Research Center, University of Washington. Her current research focuses on cross-species infectious agent transmission and she coordinates several multidisciplinary research projects in Asia, funded by NIH, which focus on the role synanthropic macaques play in disease transmission.

By: Michael Gumert(Editor), Lisa Jones-Engel(Editor), Agustín Fuentes(Author), David Quammen(Foreword By)
360 pages, 55 illustrations, 28 tables
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