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British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published six times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

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Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

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Academic & Professional Books  Habitats & Ecosystems  Coasts & Islands

On the Edge Coastlines of Britain

By: Robert Duck(Author)
222 pages, colour & b/w photos, colour & b/w illustrations
On the Edge
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  • On the Edge ISBN: 9780748697625 Paperback Jan 2015 Usually dispatched within 6 days
    £24.99
    #215476
  • On the Edge ISBN: 9780748697618 Hardback Jan 2015 Usually dispatched within 6 days
    £74.99
    #215477
Selected version: £24.99
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About this book

The building of railways has had a profound but largely ignored physical impact on Britain's coasts. On the Edge: Coastlines of Britain explores the coming of railways to the edge of Britain, the ruthlessness of the companies involved and the transformation of our coasts through the destruction or damage to the environment.

In many places today, railways are the first defence against the sea and similarly the embankments of long-closed lines act as sea walls. It is ironic, at a time when climate change is very much favouring rail as a means of transport, that many lines are increasingly exposed to extreme weather and the very actions associated with their construction have exacerbated coastal erosion. With the benefit of hindsight, many coastal railways have been built in locations that would not have been chosen today.

As our climate changes and storminess potentially increases, what might be the implications for some of Britain's lines on the edge?

Customer Reviews

By: Robert Duck(Author)
222 pages, colour & b/w photos, colour & b/w illustrations
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