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Academic & Professional Books  Earth System Sciences  Lithosphere  Structural Geology & Plate Tectonics

The Great Quake How the Biggest Earthquake in North America Changed Our Understanding of the Planet

Coming Soon
By: Henry Fountain(Author)
304 pages, 8 plates with b/w photos; 2 b/w maps
The Great Quake
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  • The Great Quake ISBN: 9781101904060 Hardback Aug 2017 Usually dispatched within 1 week
    £29.99
    #233685
  • The Great Quake ISBN: 9781101904084 Paperback Aug 2018 Available for pre-order
    £12.99
    #240977
Selected version: £29.99
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About this book

In the tradition of Erik Larson's Isaac's Storm, a riveting narrative about the biggest earthquake in recorded history in North America – the 1964 Alaskan earthquake that demolished the city of Valdez and obliterated the coastal village of Chenega – and the scientist sent to look for geological clues to explain the dynamics of earthquakes, who helped to confirm the then controversial theory of plate tectonics.

On March 27, 1964, at 5:36 p.m., the biggest earthquake ever recorded in North America – and the second biggest ever in the world, measuring 9.2 on the Richter scale – struck Alaska, devastating coastal towns and villages and killing more than 130 people in what was then a relatively sparsely populated region. In a riveting tale about the almost unimaginable brute force of nature, New York Times science journalist Henry Fountain, in his first trade book, re-creates the lives of the villagers and townspeople living in Chenega, Anchorage, and Valdez; describes the sheer beauty of the geology of the region, with its towering peaks and 20-mile-long glaciers; and reveals the impact of the quake on the towns, the buildings, and the lives of the inhabitants. George Plafker, a geologist for the U.S. Geological Survey with years of experience scouring the Alaskan wilderness, is asked to investigate the Prince William Sound region in the aftermath of the quake, to better understand its origins. His work confirmed the then controversial theory of plate tectonics that explained how and why such deadly quakes occur, and how we can plan for the next one.

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Biography

Henry Fountain has been a reporter and editor at the New York Times for two decades, writing about science for most of that time. From 1999 to 2009 he wrote Observatory, a weekly column in the Science Times section. He was an editor on the national news desk and the Sunday Review and was one of the first editors of Circuits, the Times' pioneering technology section. Prior to coming to the Times, Fountain worked at the International Herald Tribune in Paris, New York Newsday, and the Bridgeport Post in Connecticut. He is a graduate of Yale University, where he majored in architecture. He and his family live just outside of New York City.

 

Coming Soon
By: Henry Fountain(Author)
304 pages, 8 plates with b/w photos; 2 b/w maps
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