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British Wildlife

6 issues per year 84 pages per issue Subscription only

British Wildlife is the leading natural history magazine in the UK, providing essential reading for both enthusiast and professional naturalists and wildlife conservationists. Published six times a year, British Wildlife bridges the gap between popular writing and scientific literature through a combination of long-form articles, regular columns and reports, book reviews and letters.

Subscriptions from £30 per year

Conservation Land Management

4 issues per year 44 pages per issue Subscription only

Conservation Land Management (CLM) is a quarterly magazine that is widely regarded as essential reading for all who are involved in land management for nature conservation, across the British Isles. CLM includes long-form articles, events listings, publication reviews, new product information and updates, reports of conferences and letters.

Subscriptions from £18 per year
Good Reads  Natural History  General Natural History

Losing Eden Why Our Minds Need the Wild

Nature Writing New SPECIAL OFFER
By: Lucy Jones(Author)
254 pages, no illustrations
Publisher: Allen Lane
NHBS
Rigorously researched, Losing Eden is an urgent reminder of the obvious but ignored link between mental wellbeing and time spent outdoors, away from our urban environments.
Losing Eden
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  • Losing Eden ISBN: 9780241441534 Hardback Feb 2020 Usually dispatched within 1-2 weeks
    £16.99£19.99
    #248396
Price: £16.99
About this book Customer reviews Biography Related titles

About this book

Today many of us live indoor lives, disconnected from the natural world as never before. And yet nature remains deeply ingrained in our language, culture and consciousness. For centuries, we have acted on an intuitive sense that we need communion with the wild to feel well. Now, in the moment of our great migration away from nature, science has begun to catch up, with more and more evidence emerging to confirm its place at the heart of our psychological wellbeing. So what happens, asks acclaimed science journalist Lucy Jones, as we lose our bond with the natural world – might we also be losing part of ourselves?

Delicately observed and rigorously researched, Losing Eden is an enthralling journey through this new research, exploring how and why connecting with the living world can so drastically affect our health. Travelling from forest schools in East London, to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, via Poland's primeval woodlands, Californian laboratories and ecotherapists' couches, Jones takes us to the cutting edge of human biology, neuroscience and psychology, and discovers new ways of understanding our increasingly dysfunctional relationship with the earth. Urgent and uplifting, Losing Eden is a rallying cry for a wilder way of life – for finding asylum in the soil and joy in the trees – which might just help us to save the living planet, as well as ourselves, from the destructive clutches of ecological grief.

Customer Reviews

Biography

Lucy Jones is a writer and journalist based in Hampshire, England. She previously worked at NME and the Daily Telegraph, and her writing on culture, science and nature has been published in BBC Earth, BBC Wildlife, the Guardian, TIME and the New Statesman. Her first book, Foxes Unearthed, was celebrated for its 'brave, bold and honest' (Chris Packham) account of our relationship with the fox, winning the Society of Authors' Roger Deakin Award 2016.

Nature Writing New SPECIAL OFFER
By: Lucy Jones(Author)
254 pages, no illustrations
Publisher: Allen Lane
NHBS
Rigorously researched, Losing Eden is an urgent reminder of the obvious but ignored link between mental wellbeing and time spent outdoors, away from our urban environments.
Media reviews

"Beautifully written, movingly told and meticulously researched [...] a convincing plea for a wilder, richer world"
– Isabella Tree, author of Wilding

"By the time I'd read the first chapter, I'd resolved to take my son into the woods every afternoon over winter. By the time I'd read the sixth, I was wanting to break prisoners out of cells and onto the mossy moors. Losing Eden rigorously and convincingly tells of the value of the natural universe to our human hearts"
–  Amy Liptrot, author of The Outrun

"Fascinating [...] the connection between mental health and the natural world turns out to be strong and deep – which is good news in that it offers those feeling soul-sick the possibility that falling in love with the world around them might be remarkably helpful. And those who fall in love with the world might protect it, a virtuous cycle that would make a real difference in the fight for a workable planet."
– Bill McKibben, author of Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?

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